CAUSER, GEORGE EDWIN





Source



CWGC



SDGW



Uttoxeter Advertiser



Other



Parents



William Causer



Yes



Not found






5



Where born



Newborough, Burton-on-Trent, Staffordshire



Yes






5



When born



About 1874









1



Address



Bradley Street, Uttoxeter






3b



5



Wife and children: Tutbury District (at the time of his death)






3b






Spouse



Elizabeth Ann Causer



Yes






5



Yes






3b






Children



4






3b






Employment Before Joining up



Roadman for Uttoxeter County Council






3b



5



Where enlisted



Uttoxeter, Staffordshire






3a






Regiment



Army Service Corps



Yes



3a



5, 6


Unit















Rank



Private






3b






Driver



Yes






5, 6


Service Number



T4/083296



Yes






5, 6


Date of Death



30 October 1916



Yes





6


30 November 1916 (Wrong)









5



Age at time of death



42



Yes









Where Killed or died



England � Newcastle-on-Tyne












How he died



Illness � Gas poisoning






3b



5



Location of Grave or Memorial



Tutbury (St. Mary) Churchyard



Yes






2



Tutbury Church and Churchyard









5



Alrewas All Saints Church









5



Hanbury Parish Roll (St. Werburgh�s Church)








5


Awards


Victory Medal: Roll RASC/101 B 58









6

British Medal: Roll RASC/101 B 58




6

The details above relate to the only George Edwin Causer in the CWGC database. However, there has to be some doubt about whether the CWGC person is the same one as appears on the Uttoxeter War Memorials and the obituary in the Uttoxeter Advertiser[3b]. The middle initial in the Uttoxeter Advertiser’s articles about him does not correspond with the town’s memorials and the CWGC register, which use the initials G. A, instead of G. E.

Furthermore, his date of death (30th October 1916) does not tally with the date of the obituary (25 April 1917) [3b]. This would not be a problem if he had died abroad, but he is buried in Tutbury and must therefore have died in England. One would have expected his wife to have been informed when he arrived or died in the hospital in England, but there is a six-month mismatch between the two dates.

Before the war George was a Roadman, employed by the local County Council[3b]. He and his wife and children lived in Bradley Street, Uttoxeter3b.


Few original houses survive in Bradley Street, but the group of buildings on the left of this picture give some impression of what the old street was like

In April 1915 the Uttoxeter Advertiser reported that the local recruiting officer, Sergeant Armishaw, had recently enlisted George in the Army Service Corps[3]a.

According to the Uttoxeter Advertiser’s obituary, George died from gas poisoning. We do not know when he was exposed to the gas, but the Uttoxeter Advertiser’s roll of honour says that he died in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. There had therefore been time to evacuate him from the field and bring him back to England.

Official confirmation of his death was not received by his wife until April 1917, by which time she and the children were living in the Tutbury district3b.

George is buried with three others at the edge of Tutbury Churchyard on the slopes of the castle mound.

In 2006, when we visited his grave, it was in a very neglected state and difficult to get to. It is on a steep hill and care has to be taken when moving across the surrounding ground because it was full of holes formed by the collapse of adjacent graves. This difficulty was compounded by the fact that the holes were overgrown by the grass and vegetation. It was a start contrast to the beautifully maintained war cemeteries in France and Belgium.