HARVEY, ARTHUR

Photograph with kind permission of the Uttoxeter Advertiser

 

Source

CWGC

SDGW

Uttoxeter Advertiser

Other

Parents

Samuel and Lavinia Harvey

Yes

 

1a [Father’s name]

4, 6b

Where born

Uttoxeter

 

 

 

4, 6b

When born

About 1894

 

 

 

2, 6b

Address

North Lodge, Crakemarsh (parents)

Yes

 

 

 

11 Park Street, Uttoxeter (with parents)

 

 

1a, 1c

4

Spouse

 

 

 

 

 

Children

 

 

 

 

 

Employment Before Joining up

Railway Goods Depot at Uttoxeter Station

 

 

1a

 

and then two years in the Railway Goods Depot at Harecastle.

 

 

1a

4

He also worked in the goods depot at Uttoxeter Station

 

 

1a, 1b

 

When enlisted

September 1914

 

 

1a

 

Where enlisted

Burton-on-Trent, Staffordshire

 

Yes

 

 

Former Service number and Regiment

6669, 1st Cambridgeshire Territorial Force

 

Yes

 

4

Regiment

Grenadier Guards

Yes

Yes

1a, 1d

4

Unit

3rd Bn.

Yes

Yes

1d

4

Rank

Private

Yes

 

1a, 1d

4

Guardsman

 

Yes

 

 

Service Number

18959

Yes

Yes

 

4

Date of Death

27 May 1915

Yes

 

1a, 1d

4

Age at time of death

21

Yes

 

1a

 

Where Killed or died

England – Royal Berkshire Hospital in Reading

 

 

1a, 1d

4

How he died

Illness - pneumonia

 

 

1a

4

His father was employed by Messrs. Eckersley Brothers, coal merchants[1a, 4].

Before the war Arthur was a railwayman. Immediately before enlisting he had been working in the railway goods depot at Harecastle[1a]. Before that, he had worked in a similar capacity at Uttoxeter Station[1a].

According to the Soldiers Died database, he initially served as 6669 in the 1st Cambridgeshire Territorial Force and 3rd Battalion Regiment. This seems strange because his obituary in the Uttoxeter Advertiser says that he joined the Grenadier Guards in September 1914[1a]. War only broke out in August 1914.

He was still in training with the Grenadier Guards at the time of his death, which resulted when he contracted pneumonia after a march of over 40 miles[1a]. He was taken for treatment at the Royal Berkshire Hospital in Reading and seemed to have made excellent progress. Unfortunately, when all danger was thought to have passed, he suffered a relapse, which he died not recover from[1a].

His obituary in the Uttoxeter Advertiser[1a] says that at nearly 6 feet tall and of fine physique, he was a typical guardsman and very popular amongst the men of his battalion

His obituary[1a] also quotes from a letter that his parents received from Lord Kitchener.

 “The King commands me to assure you of the true sympathy of his Majesty and the Queen in your sorrow. – Kitchener.”

Arthur’s body was brought back to Uttoxeter and he was given a military funeral[1a]. His coffin was draped with the Union Flag and soldiers on leave in the town acted as pallbearers[1a]. The ‘Last Post’ was sounded over his grave[1a]

 

 

Arthur Harvey’s grave in Uttoxeter Cemetery

 

Shortly after his funeral the Uttoxeter Advertiser reported a meeting in which a representative group of all grades of the North Staffordshire Railway staff gathered at Uttoxeter Station[1b]:

The secretary, Guard L. Hassall, said that they had met to show their sympathy and to pass on votes of condolence with the relatives of the two members of the railway staff who had recently lost their lives in the service of their King and Country. One of them was Arthur Harvey and the other Tom Durose.

Mr. James Williams, goods agent, moved a vote of condolence with the parents and relatives of Arthur Harvey, and said that it was with great sympathy that he did so. Arthur Harvey was under his charge as extra porter at the goods warehouse, ad during the time he as with him he found him very steady, trustworthy and particularly attentive in his duties. After the busy season Arthur was transferred to Harecastle, from whence he had joined-up. Mr. Williams deeply regretted to hear of his untimely end.

Signalman Rudd seconded.

It was then decided that Reverend W. Armstrong of Uttoxeter’s Parish Church should be approached with a view to arranging for a memorial service. The intention was that all members of the Railway staff of the Uttoxeter district should attend.

Inspector Whitehurst proposed, and Guard Hassall seconded, that Fourth-Officer Wilks should be asked to arrange for the Ambulance Corps to be present in uniform. Mr. Wilcox said that he would be pleased to make the arrangements, but as so many had joined the forces, only a third of the members were left, and the remainder were awaiting orders. As the two deceased railwaymen were local heroes, it was therefore decided to invite other bodies from the town, including the Volunteer Corps, the Police, Boy Scouts and gentlemen of the town.

In replying to a vote of thanks, the Chairman said how very much he regretted the passing of the two young members of the staff, whose loss they mourned. They had answered the call, and were brave English lads of whom they were proud.

It was then decided that when this terrible war was over the railwaymen of Uttoxeter should subscribe for a permanent roll of honour to their noble dead, and also to those brave fellows who were spared to return, so that in future they would always have a reminder of the glorious answer of the railwaymen to their country’s call.

It is a sobering thought that this all happened in the middle of 1915 and the war still had nearly another three and a half years to run. Nobody at that meeting could have foreseen the scale of the killing to come, or the number of railwaymen who would eventually be called upon to serve and die in the forces.

This notice was posted in the Uttoxeter Advertiser in May 1916[1d]  to mark the first anniversary of his death

In Loving Memory of our dear son, Pte. Arthur Harvey, late of the 3rd Battalion Grenadier Guards, who died at the Royal Berks Hospital, Reading, May 27, 1915.

Gone from our home, oh how we miss him,

Loving him dearly, his memory we keep.

Not till life ends shall we ever forget him;

Dear to us is the place where he sleeps.

- From Father and Mother, Brothers and Sisters, Uttoxeter.